Informaticopia

Thursday, September 13, 2007

Major reports on NHS & NPfIT

Todays publication of the House of Commons Health Committee into Electronic Patient Records along with yesterdays Report Our Future Health Secured? A review of NHS funding and performance for the King's Fund means I have lots of reading to do - which is getting in the way of preparing a major document for my DPhil.

I've not got all the details from the Health Select Committee report yet but have spotted a couple of conlusions which I think point out some of the problems they have identified in the NHS's National Programme for IT and Connecting for Health approach:

NPfIT is characterised by a centralised management structure and large-scale procurement from private suppliers. This approach aims to offer improved value for money and to address the previously patchy adoption of IT systems across the health service. The Department defended the progress made by NPfIT to date, arguing that the programme is on course to succeed. However, serious doubts have been raised, from sources including the Public Accounts Committee, about how much has been achieved and about the likely completion date. In particular, progress on the development of the NCRS has been questioned.

The input of end-users is vital in planning, design and implementation.

As EPR systems make more personal health data accessible to more people, breaches of security and confidentiality must be regarded as serious matters.

The arrangements for the SCR will be strengthened when "sealed envelopes" are made available to protect sensitive information and when patients can access their record via the HealthSpace website... Connecting for Health must ensure that both "sealed envelopes" and HealthSpace are introduced as soon as possible, particularly so that their effectiveness can be assessed during the independent evaluation of the early adopter programme.

The sharing of unique smartcards between users is unacceptable and undermines the operational security of DCR systems. However, we sympathise with the A&E staff who shared smartcards when faced with waits of a minute or more to access their new PAS software. Unless unacceptably lengthy log-on times are addressed, security breaches are inevitable.

I'm sure there will be more to follow and that this report will generate wider interest - but if others have comments please add them.

Labels: , , , ,

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home